Fatal Decisions | A 5-Minute Freewrite

Fatal Decisions


Every single decision we make every day can be fatal. The randomness that rules the world may be deemed the result of the wicked threads of destiny, our own making, or the disturbing caprice of an all-powerful psycho.

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You could have decided to stay in bed with your son, who had become more demanding of your attention and warmth now that you spent more time out, looking for ways to bring bread to the table. You could have decided to not to use your car as a taxi that morning and try a long road instead from the main terminal, which was usually safer and more profitable.

You could have decided to take a different road out of endless possibilities, but you ended up the hill that lead to a dangerous barrio. You assumed your old car would not attract much attention and the early hour would presuppose you had no money yet for anyone to attempt a robbery.

You might have decided to keep your selective customer-choosing criteria, ruling our rough-looking men, even if they were one-legged. And yet, there you were picking up a man limping on a dirty wooden crutch. He was not alone, but you discovered that too late. The one-legged man and his companion sat in the back seat and a few meters later they were stabbing you in the neck, just like that.

.-.

You could have waited to get the news later that day, but the heart of the mother is said to know better, and you made that fatal call that would haunt you forever. The one-legged man picked up the phone, still euphoric about his early kill. “Don’t call your son again,” he said. “I just killed him!”

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This was my entry to @mariannewest and @latino.romano’s 5 Minute Freewrite: Single Prompt Option: fatal. You can see the details here.

Thanks for stopping. I’ll keep you posted

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16 comments
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What?! Is this from @hlezama? I guess the prompt asked for macabre or worse, but still. You're a regular Flannery O'Connor in this one.

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Much obliged! I'm flattered. O'Connor was a regular reading in my lit clases. A good man is hard to mind is one of the most haunting stories I've read. Characters like the Misfit are shocking as fictitious characters; they become even more shocking when one realizes how many of them have sprung from the cesspool of our poverty-stricken society.
There are tons of horrific stories happening around us now. A whole generation of misfits with zero sensibility or sense of remorse.

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A good man is hard to find still haunts me regularly, and I read it more than 40 years ago.

Yes, it seems all the horrible is now coming to the fore. Hopefully that means it is leaving us. I wonder what that would mean for classic literature. If there were no more horrible things done, would we be able to understand O'Connor's stories?

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Hopefully people from the future will not find O'Connor's fiction inspiring 😇
It is harder for me every day to conceive the possibility of total peace and humanity (understood as respect for other lives), unless we enter some dark chapter of genetic manipulations that might cancel out those impulses to harm and destroy. Who knows what price we'll pay for that.

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I think we are paying the price now. Venezuela has been paying the price for years and years. The impulse to destroy is burning itself out.

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(Edited)

That's correct. Actually, one of the heroes of this so-called revolution is Ezequiel Zamora. He was a leader of one of the many civil wars we had (The Federal War). It ended around the time the USA was still fighting theirs (1863). Zamora was our William Tecumseh Sherman when it came to total war.
Why would a political movement, in times of peace, with total control of all government branches use that kind of mentality as inspiration is beyond me.
What we are seeing both in infrastructure and political discourse is precisely a sort of total war where everything will be destroyed at the end, not because it was needed to win a war (that never happened), but because they enjoy the suffering they impose on anyone who thinks differently.
As a result we have a generation of criminals whose methods are absolutely brutal and sickening; gratuitious violence from two decades of gratuitious confrontation and total war discourse.

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Only two decades? I think it's been going on for far longer, at least 100 years, maybe back before your Tecumseh. And I think of whatever we are dealing with now as a force of nature that has become senile, past its useful age, dying as all things must.

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Que satánico este profesor jaja, está bien vale ya veo que pones en práctica todo lo que te enseñe en la Udo

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Jajaja! Historias de la vida real, mi querido amigo. La realidad supera la ficción.

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Wow @hlezama, that was a very macabre story and thoughts on this subject, we are indeed running a lottery with fate each day, thanks for sharing and stay awesome.



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