Garden Journal Newsletter, 5th October 2022

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Gosh, it's October already! As usual the start of spring has flown by and I still haven't planted many seeds. It's probably been a bit cold for some to germinate anyway and winter doesn't seem to want to give up early this year, with another surprise storm for us just when we thought we were warming up.

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Here I am with my aches and pains from over doing things and feeling like I'm getting old and the first post I see is an inspirational piece from @buckaroobaby about a nearly 80 year old couple and their garden. A timely reminder that age doesn't have to stop you doing what you love.

I came across @craigcryptoking's update on his beehives earlier this week. It seems the honey is starting to flow after South Africa's winter and even the bees have been in abundance. If you're interested in bee keeping then I thoroughly recommend a chat with Craig who is so knowledgeable on the subject and always willing to answer my dumb questions on it.

Food and forests are wonderful things, so seeing them both together just seems perfect to me. No wonder I was attracted to @oniemaniego's post when the title says he's growing more nitrogen fixing trees in a food forest. This is no plain factual post just on trees, though, he's always got an interesting story woven through what he writes.

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As gardeners we are all passionate about our gardening, but we tend to have favourite types of plants. I try not to get stuck in my own niche too much, because then I might miss that passion someone has in something else and of course I still love all plants. I was drawn to @monster-one's post by the statement that 200 pots were bought to pot up cacti! The whole post is a feast for the eyes, especially if you’re fond of cacti and succulents. I'm just wondering how potting some of them goes without finger damage, though. 🤔

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And on that lovely image I'll bid you farewell and thank you for joining me. Beneficiaries this week go to all the featured authors.

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14 comments
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So many dedicated gardening bloggers. I wonder what kind of combined years of experience we have represented here.

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There must be near a life time! Lots of expertise in different areas too.

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learn something new, thanks for the information.

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While we don't have storms - I wish!!! We also have snaps of abnormal cold when it should be summer sunshine. So I'm also hesitant to get the seeds out. Thanks for the mention @minismallholding.

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It has been unusually cold. I've just lit the wood burner again this morning and that's very unusual for this time of year. I think your climate is similar to ours, so I'm sure you know how unusual.

I've just suddenly realised I've highlighted brother and sister this week. 😁 Always great to read your work.

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What I love about these collections? Is there is always someone NEW to discover, to support, to follow. Today I found @oniemaniego and I'm grateful. 😍

Feeling old? It passes. Hot soak in the tub and an early night. xxx

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Glad to share about gardening minismallholding and artemislives! It a fun adventure learning something new out of the field each day. I'm like a student of Nature and the Universe!

I hope you don't find some of my previous and future posts as borderline conspiracy theory, those are just ires of a gardener surviving this era. wink


By the way, maybe you'll enjoy a warm foot spa with salt. It takes away a wrinkle at a time, jk ^^v

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Oh yes, definitely not one to miss. I've enjoyed every post I've read of his so far, although I probably haven't read enough of them.

Early nights are something I need to get better at.

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I don't reach the 80 years of that couple who dedicate themselves to the garden but I'm not so far away either. Let's say that between them and the 40-year-olds I am in the middle and I am also passionate about the garden.

Congratulations to all those you have selected, more than interesting posts each with a different content.

You are right about the beginning of spring, a sign that we are more or less at the same latitudes, although surely different continents. Also spring is coming here as you can see in my post.

The danger of the beginning of spring is that there are always cold days that can ruin the newly born crops or the buds and flowers of the plants. Today for example, Sunday October 9, the temperature dropped suddenly and was just above zero degrees, when a few days ago the maximum had reached almost 30 degrees.

October features these changes in this part of the hemisphere. Only in November the high temperature begins to park above the minimum 10 degrees and the danger of late frosts disappears.

I hope you have a good Sunday @minismallholding.

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We rarely get frosts here, so that is at least one thing I don't need to worry too much about.

Which continent are you on? I love that we get to see gardens in two seasons at the same time of year on Hive, but it's good to be able to connect with the same season across the world too.

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I also started actively planting for 3 months. turned out to be a lot of fun. I hope that I will be able to continue like this until I am old. blend in with nature. 😇 Greetings from Indonesia 🙋‍♂️

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